Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/ Sat, 26 Nov 2022 10:49:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 A Simple Equation For Thanksgiving Pet Safety https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/a-simple-equation-for-thanksgiving-pet-safety/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/a-simple-equation-for-thanksgiving-pet-safety/#respond Thu, 03 Nov 2022 07:30:18 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2391 From guest lists and travel, to groceries and cooking, preparing for Thanksgiving can be complicated. Add your pet into the mix, and you may want to hide out until New Year’s. Our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital wants to keep things simple, and we’re sharing some simple equations for a pet-safe Thanksgiving. Unattended food + hungry [...]

The post A Simple Equation For Thanksgiving Pet Safety appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>

From guest lists and travel, to groceries and cooking, preparing for Thanksgiving can be complicated. Add your pet into the mix, and you may want to hide out until New Year’s. Our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital wants to keep things simple, and we’re sharing some simple equations for a pet-safe Thanksgiving.

Unattended food + hungry pet = recipe for disaster

The abundance of mouthwatering Thanksgiving treats and fixings can be hard for your pet to resist. They may be a model canine citizen during meal times, but few pets will pass up a plate full of food left on a coffee table, or a turkey bone sticking out of the trash can. Many traditional Thanksgiving recipes contain ingredients that can be toxic for pets.

  • Turkey — The star of the Thanksgiving show can, unfortunately, cause problems for your pet. The high-fat skin can trigger pancreatitis, a painful, potentially life-threatening inflammation, and the bones can easily splinter and injure your pet’s mouth or throat.
  • Spices and herbs — Stuffing, turkey brine, and other premade holiday foods often contain herbs, essential oils, and resins that can be toxic, especially to cats. Pets who eat these ingredients have an increased risk of gastrointestinal (GI) upset or central nervous system depression. 
  • Yeast rolls — Eating unbaked yeast rolls or any raw dough can result in painful gas and intestinal bloating.
  • Xylitol — This artificial sweetener found in sugar-free candies and baked goods causes an insulin release in pets, causing their blood sugar to drop. Signs include weakness, incoordination, and seizures.
  • Alcohol — Pets are highly susceptible to alcohol poisoning. Signs include incoordination, lethargy, and vomiting.
  • Chocolate — This decadent ingredient, used in many delicious sweet treats, contains caffeine and theobromine, which stimulate the central nervous system in pets. Signs to watch for include agitation, vomiting, and diarrhea.

While the list of foods that should be avoided may seem overwhelming, raw fruits and vegetables, including baby carrots, green beans, apples, sweet potato, and pumpkin puree—not the sweetened, spiced pie filling—make great, pet-friendly Thanksgiving treats.

An open door – pet supervision = door dash

If you’re hosting Thanksgiving, your front door will likely be opened many times as friends and family trickle in. Without close supervision, your pet can slip out unnoticed, and potentially become lost or injured. As guests arrive and depart, keep your pet confined to a bedroom, or behind a baby gate, so they cannot rush out the door. 

Strangers + commotion = confusion for pets

A large group of unfamiliar people and Thanksgiving celebration commotion can make your pet nervous and uncomfortable. Set them up with a retreat, such as a quiet bedroom away from the festivities. Include some favorite toys, comfortable bedding, and calm background music, so they can take a break until they are ready to socialize. 

Curious pet + Thanksgiving decorations = emergency trip to the vet

You see festive decor, but your pet sees strange new toys that they want to chew and taste. Decorations make great additions to your holiday celebration, but not if they are ingested by your pet. Keep the following items out of your pet’s reach to avoid GI problems and an unexpected Thanksgiving veterinary bill.

  • Small gourds, pumpkins, and acorns — Pets may mistake these for toys and accidentally choke on or consume them, leading to a painful intestinal obstruction.
  • Candles — Lit candles are a nice touch, but a passing tail can be burned, or a wayward paw can knock the candle over and cause a fire.
  • Toxic plants — Several holiday plants, including autumn crocuses, lilies, and chrysanthemums, are poisonous to pets.
  • Essential oils or liquid potpourri — Many oils are toxic to pets, who may inhale droplets or absorb the oils through their skin, or while grooming, causing respiratory distress, neurologic signs, or liver failure. 

Thanksgiving road trip – pet restraint = distracted driver

If you’re traveling with your pet this Thanksgiving, secure them in a harness attached to the seat, or in a well-ventilated crate large enough for them to stand, lie down, and turn around. Keep your pet in the back car seat to avoid an injury from a deployed airbag, and ensure the crate is secured and won’t slide if you stop quickly. 

Preparation + planning = safe pet

As you make plans for your pet this Thanksgiving, remember that what matters most is simple—their safety. Of course, accidents can happen, so contact our team at Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital if you have a pet emergency. 

We provide uluslararası evden eve nakliyat, service for those who want to move their home abroad. Our Istanbul-based logistics company provides transportation services to all of Europe. First of all, we organize logistics flights to Türkiye’den beşçika’ya ev taşıma, Türkiye’den danimarka’ya ev taşıma, Türkiyeden fransaya ev taşıma, and Türkiyeden hollandaya ev taşıma, countries. Choose RSL International shipping company for insurance-assured transportation.

The post A Simple Equation For Thanksgiving Pet Safety appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/a-simple-equation-for-thanksgiving-pet-safety/feed/ 0
7 Tips to Prevent Pet Obesity https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/7-tips-to-prevent-pet-obesity/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/7-tips-to-prevent-pet-obesity/#respond Fri, 14 Oct 2022 18:43:40 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2380 Obesity is affecting an increasing number of pets. An overweight pet can face serious health consequences that decrease their longevity and reduce their quality of life. Our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team wants to help prevent pet obesity by providing tips to help maintain your pet at a healthy weight. #1: Understand the consequences [...]

The post 7 Tips to Prevent Pet Obesity appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>

Obesity is affecting an increasing number of pets. An overweight pet can face serious health consequences that decrease their longevity and reduce their quality of life. Our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team wants to help prevent pet obesity by providing tips to help maintain your pet at a healthy weight.

#1: Understand the consequences of pet obesity

Pets maintained at a healthy weight live approximately 2.5 years longer than overweight pets, because the excess weight increases your pet’s risk for numerous serious health complications, including:

  • High blood pressure — Similar to humans, overweight pets are at increased risk for high blood pressure, which can cause issues such as heart disease, kidney disease, and retinal detachment.
  • Cancer — The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has linked excess weight to 13 cancer types in people, and evidence suggests that overweight pets are also at increased risk for certain cancers.
  • Diabetes — Excess weight increases your pet’s risk for insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, which can result in cataracts, kidney issues, and diabetic ketoacidosis.
  • Arthritis — Overweight pets are 2.3 times more likely to develop arthritis than an ideal weight pet.
  • Respiratory disease — Overweight pets often have difficulty breathing because of the extra fat layer lining their chest cavity, which also puts them at higher risk for conditions such as laryngeal paralysis and tracheal collapse.
  • Skin infection — Overweight pets can’t groom themselves as well as ideal weight pets, and their excessive skin folds provide the perfect environment for bacteria and yeast to cause infection.

#2: Schedule regular wellness visits for your pet

Nine out of 10 owners whose pets are overweight consider that their pet is a normal weight. Our veterinary professionals are experts at assessing a pet’s weight, and we can also detect conditions, such as hypothyroidism and Cushing’s disease, that can contribute to your pet’s weight gain. A veterinary professional should evaluate your pet at least once a year, and your senior pet every six months, since they are at higher risk for certain health conditions.

#3: Monitor your pet’s weight

As pets age, their metabolism slows down, and they are often less active because of conditions such as arthritis. You may not notice your pet is gaining weight unless you monitor their weight status in the following ways:

  • Weighing your pet — Use a scale designed to weigh pets or babies to track your pet’s weight. Ask our veterinary professionals what they consider your pet’s ideal weight.
  • Evaluating your pet’s body condition score (BCS) — Look at a BCS chart to determine if your pet is carrying excess weight. This tool uses observation and palpation at certain body points to determine your pet’s fat storage. A BCS of one indicates your pet is excessively emaciated, and a BCS of nine indicates they are excessively obese. An ideal BCS is between four and five.

#4: Determine how much food your pet needs

Pets don’t moderate their food intake, and overfeeding is the most common cause of pet obesity. Steps to determine how much food your pet needs include:

  • Calculate your pet’s daily energy needs — Consider your pet’s age, weight, activity level, breed, and spay or neuter status to calculate their daily energy needs.
  • Read your pet’s food label — Check your pet’s food label to determine how many calories are in a certain food portion.
  • Divide your pet’s food — Ideally, pets should eat two or three times a day, so divide the amount of food they need into the number of meals they eat throughout the day.

#5: Measure your pet’s meal portions

Guesstimating your pet’s meal portion can easily lead to overfeeding. Use a standard measuring cup or a kitchen scale to accurately measure your pet’s meal portion.

#6: Limit your pet’s treats

Treats should account for no more than 10% of your pet’s overall caloric intake. Choose healthy options, such as cut up vegetables, and ensure you account for these calories in your pet’s overall daily energy allotment.

#7: Exercise your pet

All pets need daily exercise to keep mentally and physically fit. Every pet is different, and some pets require more exercise than others, depending on their breed and age. Tips to get your pet moving include:

  • Walking — Walking your pet briskly two to three times a day can be great exercise for small-breed dogs and senior pets.
  • Playing a game — If your pet has a favorite game, such as fetch, schedule time daily to work off their excess energy.
  • Chasing prey — Use a laser pointer or a wand style toy to entice your cat to run and jump as they chase their prey.
  • Playing sport — Enroll your pet in a sport, such as agility, dock diving, or flyball, to enhance their exercise experience. This also strengthens your bond, since you will spend a lot of time together practicing.

Following these tips should help you maintain your pet at a healthy weight to increase their longevity and improve their quality of life. If you would like to schedule a wellness examination so we can determine whether your pet is carrying excess weight, contact our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team, and we can develop a safe weight-loss plan, if necessary.

The post 7 Tips to Prevent Pet Obesity appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/7-tips-to-prevent-pet-obesity/feed/ 0
Assessing Your Senior Pet’s Quality of Life https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/assessing-your-senior-pets-quality-of-life/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/assessing-your-senior-pets-quality-of-life/#respond Mon, 26 Sep 2022 02:40:54 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2335 As your pet reaches their senior years, you may wonder if they are showing signs of typical age-related changes, or whether they are experiencing pain or discomfort. Your pet’s quality of life (QOL) depends on their overall physical and mental wellbeing, and accurately assessing this factor is important to ensure they aren’t suffering needlessly. Our [...]

The post Assessing Your Senior Pet’s Quality of Life appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
As your pet reaches their senior years, you may wonder if they are showing signs of typical age-related changes, or whether they are experiencing pain or discomfort. Your pet’s quality of life (QOL) depends on their overall physical and mental wellbeing, and accurately assessing this factor is important to ensure they aren’t suffering needlessly. Our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team wants to help with information about conditions that commonly affect senior pets, and how you can objectively measure their QOL.

Common senior pet health complications

Senior pets are at higher risk for many health complications, and these conditions can negatively impact their quality of life. Examples include:

  • Arthritis — If your senior pet seems to be slowing down, they may have arthritis, which is extremely common in senior pets. Inflammation and deterioration inside the joint can cause significant pain and decrease your pet’s mobility. Many pet owners contribute their pet’s decreased activity to normal aging, but treatments can alleviate your pet’s suffering if arthritis is contributing to their condition.
  • Cognitive dysfunction — Cognitive dysfunction is a condition similar to Alzheimer’s disease in humans. Affected pets exhibit signs including disorientation, social interaction and sleeping pattern changes, increased anxiety, a decline in learning and memory abilities, decreased interest in play, and house soiling. While no cure is available, management techniques can be used to slow the condition’s progression.
  • Chronic kidney disease (CKD) — Pets with CKD gradually lose kidney function. CKD has four stages, and clinical signs are typically not evident until a pet reaches stage three, which means that regular wellness screenings are important to catch such conditions in the early stages, when they are easier to treat and the prognosis is better.
  • Cancer — Your pet’s cancer risk increases as they age.

Quality of life assessment for senior pets

When assessing your senior pet, you may have difficulty determining if their condition is acceptable, but a quality of life scale, which provides guidelines to help you objectively measure your pet’s QOL, can be helpful. The scale evaluates seven categories, and scores each parameter from 1 to 10, with 10 being ideal. An overall score above 35 suggests your pet’s quality of life is acceptable. Parameters assessed include:

  • Hurt — Adequate pain control, including the ability to breathe properly, is paramount to your pet’s overall QOL. Questions to consider include:
    • Is your pet in pain?
    • Can your pet’s pain be effectively managed?
    • Can your pet breathe properly?
  • Hunger — Your pet must be able to ingest appropriate nutrients to sustain life. Questions to consider include:
    • Can your pet eat on their own?
    • Is your pet eating enough?
    • Does your pet need a feeding tube?
  • Hydration — Dehydration can lead to serious health complications that exacerbate existing conditions. Questions to consider include:
    • Can your pet drink on their own?
    • Is your pet drinking enough?
    • Can you administer subcutaneous fluids if they aren’t staying hydrated?
  • Hygiene — Keeping your pet clean is important to prevent skin irritation and infections. Questions to consider include:
    • Can your pet groom themselves appropriately?
    • Can you keep your pet clean, if they cannot groom themselves properly?
    • Does your pet have sores or infections caused by improper grooming?
  • Happiness — Your pet’s QOL also depends on their ability to experience joy. Questions to consider include:
    • Does your pet express joy and interest in daily life?
    • Does your pet exhibit signs of depression or anxiety?
    • Does your pet respond to family members, other pets, or toys?
  • Mobility — Mobility is important for pets, although pets who have limited mobility can have a good QOL if their owner is committed to assisting them. Questions to consider include:
    • Can your pet move without assistance?
    • Can you assist your pet if they can’t move without help?
    • Is your pet having seizures or incoordination issues?

You should track your pet’s QOL score each day, and when their bad days consistently outnumber their good days, their QOL is compromised, and you should initiate a plan to ensure they don’t suffer needlessly. 

Caring for your senior pet

You can’t stop your pet from aging, but you can take steps to ensure their comfort as they enter their senior years. Tips include:

  • Scheduling biannual wellness visits — Senior pets are at higher risk for serious health complications, and they should be evaluated by a veterinarian at least twice a year so these conditions can be detected in the early stages, when they are easier to treat and have a better prognosis.
  • Keeping your pet at a healthy weight — Obesity, which is a common problem in senior pets, can reduce their QOL and put them at higher risk for numerous health complications, such as metabolic disorders, cancer, kidney disease, and arthritis. Feed and exercise your senior pet appropriately to keep them at a healthy weight.
  • Providing enrichment — Providing food-puzzle toys and playing games that make your pet use their mind can help slow cognitive decline. 
  • Providing dental care — Dental disease puts your pet at higher risk for heart problems and kidney disease. Schedule regular professional veterinary dental cleanings and keep your pet’s mouth clean with at-home dental care.
  • Making changes to your home — Optimize your living space to ensure your senior pet is comfortable. Ideas include updating their bedding to an orthopedic option, placing ramps or stairs near their favorite elevated surface, ensuring their food and water bowls are easily accessible, and providing a low-sided litter box. 

Knowing how to assess your pet’s QOL will ensure they are happy for their golden years. If you are concerned about your pet’s QOL, contact our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital so we can help you determine whether they are happy and comfortable.

The post Assessing Your Senior Pet’s Quality of Life appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/assessing-your-senior-pets-quality-of-life/feed/ 0
4 Tips You Need to Know About Pet Insurance https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/4-tips-you-need-to-know-about-pet-insurance/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/4-tips-you-need-to-know-about-pet-insurance/#respond Sat, 20 Aug 2022 04:24:00 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2320 You want the best of everything for your pet—the best food, the best toys, the best grooming—and, of course, the best veterinary care. Ensure your pet gets the care they need in the event of an unexpected illness or injury with a pet insurance plan. Our team at Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital knows every pet [...]

The post 4 Tips You Need to Know About Pet Insurance appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
You want the best of everything for your pet—the best food, the best toys, the best grooming—and, of course, the best veterinary care. Ensure your pet gets the care they need in the event of an unexpected illness or injury with a pet insurance plan. Our team at Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital knows every pet deserves the best, and we have some tips to help you choose the best insurance plan for you and your pet.  

#1: Insure your pet early

The best time to buy pet insurance is when your pet is young. Younger pets are generally healthier and will have lower rates than older pets who are more prone to ailments. 

Most pet insurance companies cover pets as young as 8 weeks old, but may rule senior pets ineligible for first-time enrollment or restrict them to certain coverage plans. However, older pets with a pre-existing condition—which traditional pet insurance policies do not cover—still can be covered by insurance for non-related injuries and future illnesses.

#2: Consider your pet’s health history — If your pet has a current health problem, most pet insurance companies will consider this a pre-existing condition and will not cover veterinary expenses related to it. Pre-existing conditions may include:

  • Chronic conditions — These are conditions that can recur during your pet’s life, including breed-specific issues (e.g., allergies, other breathing problems). 
  • Bilateral conditions — A bilateral condition can happen on both sides of the body, such as hip and elbow dysplasia, cruciate ligament issues, cataracts, and luxating patellas. 
  • Intervertebral disc conditions — Intervertebral disc conditions affect the spinal cord, and can be caused by degeneration or trauma. 

While most insurance plans will not cover chronic pre-existing conditions, they may cover some curable conditions after the pet has been symptom-free for a specific period. 

#3: Compare pet insurance plans

Every insurance company’s policies will be slightly different, but most offer the following coverage options:

  • Accident-only coverage — This plan type covers accidental injuries (e.g., broken bones, foreign-object ingestion) and other medical conditions. It does not cover medications, vaccinations, or routine examinations, and generally has the lowest monthly premium. 
  • Illness and accident coverage — This plan usually covers the costs of diagnosis and treatment for conditions such as cancer, endocrine disorders, and some orthopedic injuries. Because this plan is more comprehensive, it has a higher premium.
  • Wellness coverage — Many pet insurance companies offer wellness riders that you can add to most accident and illness plans. These riders may cover preventive services, such as:
    • Annual wellness exams
    • Vaccinations
    • Routine blood work
    • Spay and neuter procedures
    • Dental cleanings
    • Flea, tick, and heartworm prevention and testing

#4: Read the pet insurance fine print

Do not choose a pet insurance plan or company based solely on price. Instead, carefully research the coverage to ensure you choose the right fit for you and your pet. Other factors to consider when comparing insurance plans include:

  • Reimbursement — Some pet insurance companies make full or partial payments directly to the veterinarian, so you do not have to pay out of pocket or file a claim. Others require policyholders to pay their provider in full and file a reimbursement claim online or through an app. Most pet insurance companies process a claim in 10 working days.
  • Waiting periods — Most pet insurance plans have a 14-day waiting period before you can file a claim. Some plans have shorter waiting periods for accident coverage than for illness coverage. Insurance companies consider health conditions that arise during the policy waiting period as pre-existing conditions, and will not cover these illnesses. 
  • Deductibles —  A deductible is the non-reimbursable amount you must pay toward your pet’s veterinary costs before the insurance policy starts to cover these fees. The higher your deductible, the lower your premiums. Some companies offer adjustable monthly premiums and deductible levels when you first sign up, and the overall cost will vary by company.
  • Maximum annual coverage — Some pet insurance companies limit how much they will pay out every year. In these cases, you typically can choose your coverage cap, which usually ranges from $5,000 to unlimited. Choosing a higher coverage cap will increase your monthly premiums.
  • Discounts — Most pet insurance companies offer discounts for multi-pet coverage. Check whether you are eligible for any discounts from the company you choose.

Researching and understanding your pet insurance options takes time, but these tips can help you choose the right plan for your pet’s needs and your budget. Contact our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team with any pet insurance-related questions, or to schedule an appointment.

The post 4 Tips You Need to Know About Pet Insurance appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/4-tips-you-need-to-know-about-pet-insurance/feed/ 0
4 Tips to Ensure a Successful Pet Adoption https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/4-tips-to-ensure-a-successful-pet-adoption/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/4-tips-to-ensure-a-successful-pet-adoption/#respond Tue, 26 Jul 2022 00:30:30 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2313 Adopting a pet entails more than providing food, water, and shelter. A pet is a big responsibility, and careful consideration and planning is required before you bring home a new pet. Our team at Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital wants to help by providing tips to successfully adopt a new pet. #1: Ensure you are ready [...]

The post 4 Tips to Ensure a Successful Pet Adoption appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
Adopting a pet entails more than providing food, water, and shelter. A pet is a big responsibility, and careful consideration and planning is required before you bring home a new pet. Our team at Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital wants to help by providing tips to successfully adopt a new pet.

#1: Ensure you are ready to adopt a pet

When you adopt a pet, you are committing to providing care for that pet for the rest of their life—and you must not take the situation lightly. You should also consider the following when deciding if you are ready for pet adoption:

  • Cost — Pets can be expensive. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), owning a dog costs about $500 to $1,040 annually, depending on their breed, while cats cost about $634 per year. The cost of food, veterinary care, treats, and other supplies adds up quickly, and can increase greatly if your pet experiences a veterinary emergency. Ensure your bank account is sufficient before adopting a pet. We recommend building a pet health savings of several thousand dollars, or investing in a good pet health insurance plan so that you will be prepared for the potential expense if injury or severe illness occurs.
  • Time — Pets require attention and exercise every day. If your job keeps you away from home for long periods, or if you travel frequently, a pet may not be a good idea.
  • Family members — Ensure all family members are willing to accommodate a new pet before you adopt.
  • Other pets — Ensure other household pets will accept a new pet.

#2: Choose the right pet for your family

Pets come in many different sizes and temperaments, and choosing the right fit for your family is important for a successful adoption. Considerations about different pets include:

  • Small-breed dogs — Small-breed dogs, such as chihuahuas, toy poodles, and dachshunds, don’t need as much exercise as more active breeds, but their weight must be monitored carefully to prevent obesity. They have small, fragile bones, and may not be the best breed if you have small children in the home.
  • Large-breed dogs — Large-breed dogs, such as Labrador retrievers, Australian Shepherds, and boxers, typically require more exercise, and are best for active families. Ensure your home is large enough to accommodate the dog.
  • Cats — Cats tend to be more independent than dogs, but they still require daily attention and exercise. They don’t need to be walked daily, but their litter box needs frequent cleaning. Cats make great companions, and they are especially good choices for families with senior members living in the home.
  • Puppies and kittens — Puppies and kittens are adorable, but they require a lot of time and attention to socialize and train them appropriately. They can also be destructive as they learn the house rules.
  • Senior pets — Senior pets tend to be quieter, and most are already trained and easy to handle. However, be prepared to provide your senior pet with the veterinary care they need, since they are at higher risk for illnesses.

#3: Prepare your home for your new pet

Before bringing your new pet home, prepare your home to make the transition as easy as possible. Suggestions include:

  • Purchase supplies — Purchase the necessary supplies, such as collar, leash, pet beds, food, bowls, toys, and litter box, ahead of time, so you are prepared.
  • Place a pet bed in every room — Pets are more likely to stay off your furniture if you provide comfortable alternatives.
  • Store decorative rugs — You may want to store decorative rugs until your new addition is fully house trained.
  • Provide scratching posts — Cats are less likely to shred your furniture if they have scratching posts.
  • Offer appropriate toys — Ensure you have many chew toys for your pet, so they aren’t tempted to chew off-limits items, such as your shoes.

#4: Introduce your new pet to your resident pet

If you have a resident pet, appropriately introducing your new pet is important to ensure the adoption is successful. Tips include:

  • Introducing a new dog to a resident dog — When possible, the first meeting should take place in a neutral environment, preferably outside.
    • Each dog should be restrained by a different person, and introduced at a distance.
    • Once they remain calm, they can gradually be brought closer together to meet.
    • If neither dog shows aggression, they can be released in a fenced area to get to know each other. 
    • If the dogs seem to get along, you can take the dogs into your home, ensuring they each have their own supplies to avoid property disputes.
    • Allow only supervised interactions until you are confident the dogs are compatible.
  • Introducing a new cat to a resident cat — Cats don’t usually like change, and introducing two cats takes time and patience. 
    • Place the new cat in a separate room that has all the necessary supplies. 
    • Feed the cats on either side of the closed door to help them make a positive association.
    • Exchange the cats’ bedding to get them used to each other’s smell.
    • Once the new cat is settled, allow them to explore the rest of the house while your resident cat is confined to one room. 
    • Crack the door, and allow your cats to meet through the open door. 
    • If neither cat shows aggression, open the door fully to let them get to know each other.
    • Allow only supervised interactions until you are confident the cats are compatible.
  • Introducing a dog and a cat — Ensure your dog is not aggressive toward cats before making introductions.
    • Place the new pet in a separate room that has all the necessary supplies.
    • Feed the pets on either side of the closed door.
    • Exchange the pets’ bedding to get them used to each other’s smell. 
    • Have someone restrain your dog with a collar and leash, and take your cat into the room, remaining at a good distance.
    • Allow your cat to run away if they wish.
    • Let the pets make contact as long as they show no aggression.
    • Allow only supervised interactions until you are confident the pets are compatible.

Adopting a new pet is exciting, and your adoption will be successful if you prepare appropriately. When you adopt a new pet, contact our team at Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital, so we can meet your new addition and ensure they have a clean bill of health.

The post 4 Tips to Ensure a Successful Pet Adoption appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/4-tips-to-ensure-a-successful-pet-adoption/feed/ 0
Bang, Boom, Pow! July Fourth Pet Safety https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/bang-boom-pow-july-fourth-pet-safety/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/bang-boom-pow-july-fourth-pet-safety/#respond Tue, 14 Jun 2022 03:43:49 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2277 July Fourth has an unmistakable soundtrack that includes booming fireworks, sizzling grills, and splashing water, each year making a year’s worth of summer memories. Unfortunately, these sounds—and their circumstances—can also underscore a potentially treacherous time for pets.  Don’t wait until the symphony—or cacophony—starts to prepare your pet for the July Fourth celebrations. Protect their health [...]

The post Bang, Boom, Pow! July Fourth Pet Safety appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
July Fourth has an unmistakable soundtrack that includes booming fireworks, sizzling grills, and splashing water, each year making a year’s worth of summer memories. Unfortunately, these sounds—and their circumstances—can also underscore a potentially treacherous time for pets. 

Don’t wait until the symphony—or cacophony—starts to prepare your pet for the July Fourth celebrations. Protect their health and safety—and create peace among the percussion—with these tips from Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

Boom!—Fireworks and pets

According to one survey a few years ago, more than 40 percent of dogs are extremely sensitive to sounds—especially loud, unpredictable noises like thunder and fireworks. Dogs with this condition (i.e., noise aversion) experience intense anxiety comparable to a human panic attack. However, many owners don’t realize that noise aversion is a medical condition, and do not seek treatment or mention the issue to their veterinarian. This puts dogs—and to a lesser extent, cats—at risk for life-threatening harm or injury, if they panic and try to escape or run away. As a result, July fifth is the busiest day of the year at most animal shelters, who take in many lost pets and help worried pet owners hopeful for a reunion.

Noise aversion often begins in early life, but can begin at any age, so do not assume your pet will be comfortable with fireworks. Instead, be proactive by:

  • Ensuring your pet wears current identification — If your pet does escape, visible identification (e.g., collar or harness and tags) will increase their chances of a safe return. For the greatest peace of mind, have your pet microchipped and the chip registered.  
  • Speaking with your veterinarian — Noise-averse pets can be helped with anti-anxiety medication, sedatives, and calming supplements. Speak to your Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital veterinarian about what’s right for your pet.
  • Exercising your pet before fireworks begin Physical activity will relieve stress and help your pet rest during the evening. 
  • Staying indoors — Keep your pets indoor during fireworks, and never take them to a fireworks display.
  • Creating a safe space — Give your pet a quiet, secure place where they can stay during the noisiest times. Include your pet’s essentials (e.g., bed, toys, litterbox, water) and play white noise to dull the sounds outside.
  • Promoting calm — Use calming pheromones, which send chemical messages similar to hormones, to help your pet feel calm and secure. We recommend Adaptil for dogs and Feliway for cats.

Sizzle!—Cookout safety and pets

Meaty smells wafting in the air and the grill’s unmistakeable sizzle beckon to all—both two-legged and four-legged. But, no matter how eagerly your pet wants to join the neighborhood block party or backyard cookout, you must be their wingman and keep them safe from grill-related hazards, which include:

  • Harmful foods — Pet-toxic foods, including onions, macadamia nuts, alcohol, and raisins, are abundant at summer gatherings, as well as many sugar-free products that contain xylitol. Undercooked meat can harbor unhealthy bacteria, while greasy or fatty meat trimmings and sugary or salty foods can trigger dangerous pancreatitis. 
  • Obstructions — Sometimes a pet’s eyes are bigger than their stomach—in this case their intestines. Pets may suffer from an intestinal obstruction and require emergency surgery after eating raw or cooked bones, corn cobs, food wrappers and, in extreme cases, utensils. 
  • Burns — Counter-surfing dogs and cats trying to snag food from the grill can suffer serious burns. Keep your pet leashed or indoors while you are grilling, or put the grill behind a barrier to protect nosy noses and greedy paws.

Buzz!—Parasite prevention for pets

Summer is the peak season for pesky parasites, including mosquitoes, fleas, and ticks. And, while protecting pets who venture outdoors may seem obvious, you must also protect your indoor-only cats and dogs. Heartworm disease-carrying mosquitoes can slip inside through a torn window screen or open door, while ticks and fleas can hitch a ride inside on clothing, shoes, or other pets. 

For the best parasitic disease defense, ensure your pet receives year-round heartworm, flea, and tick preventives from Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital, as well as an annual heartworm test. Also, remove standing water, clear brush and leafy debris, and trim weeds and grass to limit backyard pests.

Splash!—Water safety for pets

Many Americans spend July Fourth on or near the water—a decision thoroughly endorsed by water-loving dogs. If your holiday will include floating, boating, beaches, or river banks, practice the following precautions:

  • Outfit your pet with a life jacket — All dogs—including strong swimmers—should wear a life jacket, which can save their life if they become tired, unconscious, or panic in the water.  
  • Take frequent breaks — Water activities can quickly exhaust a dog and make them vulnerable to injury, strong currents, or drowning. Take breaks often, and provide fresh water and shade.
  • Watch for heat stress — Overheated pets can suffer from heatstroke, which can quickly become a life-threatening emergency. 
  • Avoid stagnant or algae-filled water — Contaminated water can contain giardia- or leptospirosis-causing bacteria, and contacting blue-green algae can cause fatal toxicosis.
  • Supervise your pet — Pets should never be left unattended near water. 

The Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital wishes you and your pet a safe and enjoyable July Fourth. If you’d like to discuss your pet’s noise aversion, or refill your pet’s anti-anxiety medication, please contact us as soon as possible, to avoid the holiday rush.

The post Bang, Boom, Pow! July Fourth Pet Safety appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/bang-boom-pow-july-fourth-pet-safety/feed/ 0
Did You Know? Pets’ Allergies Explained https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/did-you-know-pets-allergies-explained/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/did-you-know-pets-allergies-explained/#respond Fri, 03 Jun 2022 03:35:29 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2273 When your seasonal allergies kick into overdrive during the spring and summer, you may notice your pet suffering too. But pets’ allergy signs are different from yours, which can be difficult for you to appreciate. Our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team is here to help you understand the difference between pet and human allergies by [...]

The post Did You Know? Pets’ Allergies Explained appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
When your seasonal allergies kick into overdrive during the spring and summer, you may notice your pet suffering too. But pets’ allergy signs are different from yours, which can be difficult for you to appreciate. Our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team is here to help you understand the difference between pet and human allergies by describing common pet allergy signs you should learn to  recognize.

Did you know? Food allergies are not the most common pet allergy

When your pet develops allergies, you may think their food, specifically grain ingredients, is the culprit. However, pet food allergies are rare, and grain allergies are extremely rare. In fact, most pets’ allergies are a hypersensitivity to their diet’s protein (e.g., chicken, lamb, beef, dairy, soy). Environmental allergies are pets’ most common allergy type, followed by flea bite allergies. Pets with environmental allergies often experience a hypersensitivity to pollen, mold, and dust, but they can develop an allergy to any substance.

Did you know? Fleas can cause severe pet allergies

Surprisingly, pets who have a flea allergy can have a massive reaction to this tiny pest, because they are sensitive to a flea saliva protein, which can cause an allergy to flare up after only a few flea bites. Flea allergies often cause the classic signs of hair loss, itching, and scabbing on the hind end and tail, since fleas like to nest at the tail’s base. You may not see fleas on your allergic pet—cats quickly groom off the pests—but you may notice tiny black specks (i.e., flea dirt). Ensuring your pet receives year-round flea prevention is the best way to prevent fleas from causing a severe, uncomfortable reaction.

Did you know? Antihistamines generally treat pets’ allergies ineffectively

To relieve their sneezing and itchy watery eyes, owners who have allergies take an antihistamine, which calms these upper respiratory signs and dries up secretions. However, a pet’s allergies typically manifest as skin problems, making antihistamines ineffective. Pets’ allergy treatments need to soothe the itch response and battle skin issues. Therapies may include:

  • Corticosteroids
  • Specific anti-itch medication such as Apoquel (i.e., oclacitinib) or Cytopoint (i.e., monoclonal antibody)
  • Medicated shampoos and wipes
  • Ear cleaners and medications
  • Immunotherapy
  • Prescription diets
  • Skin supplements

As your pet ages, their allergy treatment regimen will likely change, since allergies typically worsen over time. However, many treatment options are available to keep your pet comfortable and itch-free, and by adjusting their regimen, we can successfully manage your pet’s allergies.

Did you know? Pet allergies can occur year-round

Some pets unfortunately suffer from year-round allergy flare-ups, because they may have food or dust mite allergies, or flea bite hypersensitivity. Some pets who have only experienced seasonal allergies may begin experiencing longer allergy seasons, or may develop more severe allergy signs as each year passes. So, while your 2-year-old Labrador retriever may be licking and chewing their paws during spring’s first flush, as they age, they may also develop ear infections and more generalized itching throughout the summer and fall. Keep in mind that allergies fluctuate and change over time, so be on the lookout for differences in your pet’s normal allergy signs.

Did you know? A two-pronged approach works best for managing pets’ allergies

While administration of your pet’s at-home allergy treatments can effectively squelch their itching flares-up, following a two-pronged allergy treatment approach—at-home management and veterinary treatment—will keep your pet as comfortable as possible. Clean your pet’s ears regularly, bathe them with medicated shampoo, and provide skin supplements to decrease the number of allergens lingering on your pet’s skin and to strengthen the skin barrier. Running an air purifier and washing your pet’s bedding and other linens frequently remove dust and other allergens from the air, and can help. But, when your pet needs a little extra help coping with an allergy flare-up, schedule an appointment with our team.

If your pet is an allergy sufferer, watch them closely for allergy flare-up signs. As soon as your furry pal begins scratching, licking, and chewing, contact our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team for an appointment. 

The post Did You Know? Pets’ Allergies Explained appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/did-you-know-pets-allergies-explained/feed/ 0
5 Common Myths About Heartworm Disease in Pets https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/5-common-myths-about-heartworm-disease-in-pets/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/5-common-myths-about-heartworm-disease-in-pets/#respond Fri, 27 May 2022 02:27:14 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2268 Pet owners may be confused about heartworm disease, and they need to understand this disease’s transmission, signs, treatment, and prevention. Many myths abound about heartworm disease, making the subject more confusing, but our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team is here to set the story straight. Myth #1: Only dogs can get heartworm disease Truth: While [...]

The post 5 Common Myths About Heartworm Disease in Pets appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
Pet owners may be confused about heartworm disease, and they need to understand this disease’s transmission, signs, treatment, and prevention. Many myths abound about heartworm disease, making the subject more confusing, but our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team is here to set the story straight.

Myth #1: Only dogs can get heartworm disease

Truth: While dogs and wild canines are heartworms’ preferred hosts, any mammal can contract these insidious parasites. Fortunately, heartworms do not live as long in human and other mammal hosts as they do in dogs, but they can still  cause unfavorable hosts to suffer. For example, if cats contract heartworm disease, they can show a wide range of signs that include asthma-like problems, vomiting, difficulty walking, or sudden collapse or death. So, although your dog is more likely to develop heartworm disease because of their increased exposure to mosquitoes and because they are the parasite’s preferred host, your cat is also at risk for contracting this serious illness.

Myth #2: Pets are safe from heartworm disease in the winter

Truth: Although bitterly cold temperatures can kill heartworm-transmitting mosquitoes, your pet’s heartworm disease risk continues in colder weather, because mosquitoes can head into your garage or your home to wait out the winter, feasting on your pet to survive. In addition, mosquitoes will emerge from hiding to find their next meal if the temperature rises above 35 degrees, which puts your pet at risk for heartworm disease.

Mosquitoes are not only a year-round threat—pet owners should be aware that heartworm disease can be tricky. Most heartworm prevention medicines work by killing the microfilariae (i.e., heartworm larvae) that a mosquito’s bite injects in your pet. Essentially, heartworm prevention medicine is a monthly bloodstream dewormer rather than an intestinal tract dewormer. If you skip your pet’s heartworm preventive dose in January because the temperatures are so cold, you are leaving your pet open to infection that may have started developing during those few warm December days, which underscores the importance of giving heartworm prevention year-round.

Myth #3: Heartworm disease is no big deal

Truth: Untreated heartworm disease is a serious, life-threatening condition. And, while the microfilariae are maturing as they migrate to the blood vessels around the heart and lungs, they are severely and permanently damaging your pet’s body. The scar tissue heartworms cause remains after heartworm treatment, and can lead to your pet’s lifelong respiratory and cardiac issues. 

Myth #4: Annual testing is unnecessary because my pet shows no heartworm disease signs

Truth: Heartworm disease can take months or years to cause apparent illness signs. Microfilariae take about six months to mature, although they can cause issues as they grow. Pets often compensate well if they are infected with a small worm burden, but as the worms grow and reproduce—causing more damage—signs can become apparent. 

Your dog’s first heartworm disease signs can include a mild, persistent cough and exercise intolerance. As the disease progresses, your dog may display a reduced appetite, mild exercise fatigue, and a worsening cough. With time, heart failure can develop, causing the abdomen to swell with fluid.

Cats’ first heartworm disease signs may be sudden death, which makes their prevention especially important. Other heartworm disease signs in cats can include difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, problems walking, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Myth #5: Pets’ heartworm disease treatment is as easy as prevention

Truth: Monthly heartworm disease prevention can be as simple as giving your dog a tasty chew, or applying a liquid topical product to the back of your cat’s neck, but treating the disease is much more difficult. Dogs’ heartworm disease treatment consists of a series of lumbar muscle injections, which can cause nausea and discomfort. To ensure all the worms are killed off slowly enough to prevent side effects, three injections are typically administered—the first two 24 hours apart, and the third a month later. In addition, you must severely restrict your dog’s activity level by allowing them to go outside only to eliminate, and keeping them confined or quiet for a month after treatment. This treatment protocol is not ideal, but is highly effective. Unfortunately, no heartworm disease treatment has been approved for cats.

Heartworm disease is a serious condition that can affect your cat or dog, regardless of how much time they spend outdoors. Keep your furry pal safe from this mosquito-borne threat by ensuring they remain current on their heartworm prevention medicine. To ensure year-round protection without the risk of missing monthly doses, we recommend Proheart 12, which is an annual injection. Contact our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team to discuss the ideal heartworm preventive for your pet.

The post 5 Common Myths About Heartworm Disease in Pets appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/5-common-myths-about-heartworm-disease-in-pets/feed/ 0
My Pet’s Blood Work: What Does It Mean, and Why Is It Important? https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/my-pets-blood-work-what-does-it-mean-and-why-is-it-important/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/my-pets-blood-work-what-does-it-mean-and-why-is-it-important/#respond Fri, 20 May 2022 18:11:02 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2264 When our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team sees your pet, whether for a wellness visit or a sick patient exam, we will likely recommend blood work. We commonly use blood panels to evaluate your pet’s health and to determine why they are ill. However, when you review your pet’s blood work results, the meaning of [...]

The post My Pet’s Blood Work: What Does It Mean, and Why Is It Important? appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
When our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team sees your pet, whether for a wellness visit or a sick patient exam, we will likely recommend blood work. We commonly use blood panels to evaluate your pet’s health and to determine why they are ill. However, when you review your pet’s blood work results, the meaning of all those unfamiliar clinical abbreviations and numbers may confuse you. Don’t worry—a veterinary degree is not required to understand your pet’s blood work results, because our team will review the results with you, and explain why we may recommend additional testing. Our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital veterinarians are always available to review your pets’ testing and results with you.

What does my pet’s CBC mean?

A complete blood count (CBC) is one-half of pets’ most common blood tests, and evaluates your pet’s blood components—red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and platelets (PLTs)—for anemia, dehydration, infection, clotting ability, and the immune system’s status. Some of the CBC’s most important findings include:

  • RBCs — RBC level changes indicate hydration status and anemia.
  • WBCs — Stress, infection, inflammation, leukemia, and bone marrow issues can affect WBCs.
  • NEUs —Neutrophils are inflammatory cells.
  • LYMPHs — Lymphocytes are immune cells that can increase with chronic infection.
  • MONOs — Monocytes are inflammatory cells associated with tissue repair.
  • EOSs — Eosinophils are inflammatory cells that may indicate hypersensitivity, allergies, and parasites.
  • BASOs — Basophils are inflammatory cells that may indicate hypersensitivity, allergies, and parasites.
  • PLTs — PLTs allow the blood to clot and stop bleeding.
  • HCT — The hematocrit level indicates the percentage of red blood cells in a blood sample, and is helpful for diagnosing dehydration or anemia. 

What does my pet’s blood chemistry profile mean?

A comprehensive blood chemistry profile assesses your pet’s overall organ function, evaluating their kidneys, liver, and pancreas, and measuring the electrolyte and protein levels in your pet’s blood. Some blood chemistry profiles focus on specific organs. Common blood chemistry profile results abbreviations include:

  • BUN — Blood urea nitrogen measures the kidneys’ ability to filter and remove urea, the body’s waste product. An elevated BUN can indicate kidney disease or dehydration.
  • CRE — Creatinine is another bodily waste product that the kidneys filter and remove. An elevated CRE can indicate kidney disease.
  • ALT — Alanine aminotransferase can indicate liver disease, but cannot identify the cause.
  • ALP — Alkaline phosphatase may be elevated in pets with liver disease or Cushing’s disease, or in young, still-growing pets.
  • TBIL — Total bilirubin indicates liver problems or anemia.
  • AMYL and LIP — Amylase and lipase are two pancreatic enzymes that may be elevated in pets with pancreatitis and other conditions.
  • TP — Total protein is the amount of the blood’s protein, and assesses your pet’s hydration status.
  • GLU — Glucose indicates your pet’s blood sugar level, and an elevated blood glucose can indicate diabetes.

A complete blood chemistry profile measures various electrolytes, such as sodium, potassium, and chloride, to evaluate the body’s ability to maintain fluid balances, clot blood (i.e., stop bleeding), and perform nervous and muscle system functions. Additional testing can help zoom in on a particular diagnosis or disease process.

Why would my pet need blood work?

Blood work is a vital diagnostic tool that helps our veterinarians evaluate your pet’s health, and when paired with a physical exam, we can form a complete picture of how your pet’s body is functioning, and pinpoint their condition’s cause. We may recommend that your pet have blood drawn in the following instances:

  • Baseline establishment — Throughout your pet’s life, routine blood panels such as a CBC and chemistry profile establish a baseline of normal values. Over time, we determine your pet’s normal, which will serve us better in identifying subtle abnormalities.
  • Early detection screening — As your pet grows older, those routine wellness visit blood panels can help us detect a health issue in the early stages, when the disease can be more easily treated, providing your pet a better quality of life for longer. Comparing up-to-date blood work results with several years’ previous results helps us spot a problem much sooner than a physical exam alone. Pets can hide disease processes for a long time before signs become evident.
  • Pre-anesthetic testing — When your pet undergoes anesthesia, their body must metabolize anesthetic agents, tolerate blood pressure and temperature decreases, and face other challenges. Pre-anesthetic blood work ensures your pet is healthy enough to undergo anesthesia, and we can then design a customized anesthetic protocol to help minimize and prepare for potential problems. 
  • Therapeutic drug monitoring — Therapeutic medications help maintain pets’ quality of life when they are diagnosed with chronic health conditions such as diabetes, thyroid disease, heart disease, kidney failure, and osteoarthritis.  However, some of these medications have a narrow therapeutic range, and your pet can have an adverse reaction if they receive too much or too little. Your veterinarian will want to routinely monitor your pet’s therapeutic drug levels to ensure their medication doses are on the right track.

Is your pet due for blood work? Or, are you confused about your pet’s recent blood work results? Contact our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team to schedule an appointment or to discuss your pet’s blood work results.

The post My Pet’s Blood Work: What Does It Mean, and Why Is It Important? appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/my-pets-blood-work-what-does-it-mean-and-why-is-it-important/feed/ 0
Your Pet’s Anesthesia Experience https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/your-pets-anesthesia-experience/ https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/your-pets-anesthesia-experience/#respond Wed, 04 May 2022 02:32:01 +0000 https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/?p=2240 Veterinary medical professionals must administer anesthesia to provide your pet essential—at times, lifesaving—treatment in a pain- and fear-free environment. Although our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital veterinary professionals often administer anesthesia, its use is never routine. Our conscientious anesthesia administration protocols reflect our patient safety and health commitment. Anesthesia for pets An anesthetized patient experiences complete [...]

The post Your Pet’s Anesthesia Experience appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
Veterinary medical professionals must administer anesthesia to provide your pet essential—at times, lifesaving—treatment in a pain- and fear-free environment. Although our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital veterinary professionals often administer anesthesia, its use is never routine. Our conscientious anesthesia administration protocols reflect our patient safety and health commitment.

Anesthesia for pets

An anesthetized patient experiences complete sensation loss in the target area. Anesthesia types are categorized by depth, and include:

  • Local anesthesia— Local anesthesia’s numbing effects pertain to a specific body region. Local anesthesia can be combined with general anesthesia for uses such as dental nerve blocks.
  • Sedation — Sedation is typically administered intramuscularly or intravenously, with the sensation-loss depth ranging from light to deep. Sedation alleviates your pet’s anxiety, and can help with proper X-ray positioning, or be administered as a general anesthesia precursor.
  • General anesthesia — Under general anesthesia, your pet experiences a complete—but carefully controlled—loss of consciousness and physical sensation, which is necessary for their veterinarian to safely perform precise procedures (e.g., high-level diagnostic imaging, painful treatments, surgeries)

Humans’ physicians and dentists may use additional anesthesia types (e.g., twilight anesthesia, conscious sedation), but veterinary professionals do not need these types because, unlike humans, animals do not drive or need to make their own care decisions after medical procedures.

Pets’ common anesthesia risks

Although anesthesia is never risk-free, veterinary anesthesia is relatively safe. The overall anesthetic death risk for dogs is 0.17% and for cats is 0.24%, and lower still for healthy pets—0.05% for dogs and 0.11% for cats. The most common causes for anesthesia-related complications include:

  • Conformation — Brachycephalic (i.e., flat-faced) dogs and cats have a naturally small airway, and may experience respiratory distress. 
  • Patient size — Extremely small pets may be difficult to regulate under anesthesia.
  • Body condition — Excess body weight strains pets’ cardiovascular system.
  • Shock — Emergency situations (e.g., physical trauma, bloat, severe pain) can create a cascade of shock-related abnormalities, including cardiac arrest.
  • Pre-existing conditions — Underlying heart issues, liver or kidney disease, and some types of cancer may create anesthetic complications. Fortunately, pre-anesthesia screenings identify many of these conditions. 

Pet anesthesia safety

As an American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA)-accredited practice, Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital complies with the most stringent anesthesia safety practices. In addition to our standard protocols, we tailor each patient’s anesthesia medications to suit their age, health, breed, and anxiety level. This customized approach ensures each pet undergoes a smooth and stress-free experience.  

Our anesthesia safety protocol begins before your pet’s procedure, and may include:

  • Pre-anesthesia exam — For scheduled (i.e., non-emergent) procedures, this examination is part of your pet’s initial appointment. In addition, an abbreviated exam is performed on the surgery day.
  • Blood work and urinalysis — Depending on your pet’s age and health history, lab work may be performed to identify potential adverse conditions (e.g., anemia, clotting disorders, infection, organ dysfunction) that could cause intraoperative or postoperative complications.
  • Diagnostic imaging — We may need X-rays or ultrasound to identify lung changes or abdominal abnormalities.

On your pet’s procedure day, our anesthetic safety measures include:

  • Preoperative medication — Anxiety and stress can trigger inflammation in the body and worsen preoperative pain. We administer a light sedative and analgesic to help your pet relax.
  • Intravenous catheter — Once your pet is calm, we place an intravenous (IV) catheter in their front or rear leg. The catheter allows for medication and fluid administration, and provides direct access in an emergency situation.
  • IV fluids — Anesthesia medications can cause low blood pressure, and fluids support healthy circulation.
  • Endotracheal tube — Once anesthesia is induced and your pet is fully relaxed, we pass an endotracheal tube into their airway to provide a secure exchange for oxygen and anesthetic gas. The tube also protects your pet’s lungs from debris (i.e., aspiration).
  • Inhalant anesthesia — Once the endotracheal tube is in place, your pet is connected to an anesthesia machine that delivers a steady oxygen and anesthetic gas flow. The oxygen and gas levels are each carefully titrated to match your pet’s lung size and anesthetic depth.
  • Dedicated anesthetist — From anesthesia induction to recovery, a dedicated veterinary technician cares solely for your pet, continuously monitoring them and informing the veterinarian if an adverse condition arises.
  • Electronic monitoring — A multi-parameter vital monitor continuously measures your pet’s heart and respiratory rate, cardiac electrical activity, blood oxygenation, blood pressure, and core temperature. 
  • Heat support — An anesthetized pet’s body temperature does not self-regulate, so we provide gentle warming through pet-safe heated blankets, warm towels, and a heated table.
  • Pain management  Pain is assessed and treated as the fourth vital sign. If your pet seems painful, their dedicated veterinary technician will ask the veterinarian to provide additional medication.
  • Recovery — Your pet will feel vulnerable during anesthesia recovery, so we transfer them to a warm, quiet cage, continuing close monitoring until they are extubated, alert, and able to maintain their body temperature without supportive measures.

You may be concerned about your pet needing a procedure that requires anesthesia, but rest assured that we will take every precaution to protect your pet and ensure they have a successful, stress-free experience. If you have been hesitating to schedule your pet’s anesthetic procedure, contact our Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital team to discuss your concerns and your pet can receive the care they need.

The post Your Pet’s Anesthesia Experience appeared first on Vet In Dayton | Twin Maples Veterinary Hospital.

]]>
https://twinmaplesvethospital.com/your-pets-anesthesia-experience/feed/ 0